Spin bike now “indoor cycling” to avoid copyright infringement

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Correction: An incorrect copyright was reported. Mad Dogg Athletics trademarked the term “spin.” To avoid the term, the kinesiology department changed courses to indoor cycling.

Kinesiology Instructor Medin K. Barreira takes class role Feb. 5 while pedaling his bike during KINE 1180, Indoor Cycling 1, in Room 126 of Candler. Photo by Riley Stephens

Kinesiology Instructor Medin K. Barreira takes class role Feb. 5 while pedaling his bike during KINE 1180, Indoor Cycling 1, in Room 126 of Candler. Photo by Riley Stephens

By J’son Tillmon

sac-ranger@alamo.edu

The kinesiology department changed the name of cycling courses in the fall to avoid a copyright infringement claim.

KINE 1180, Spin Bike 1, and KINE 2180, Spin Bike 2, became Indoor Cycling 1 and 2.

Mad Dogg Athletics, an equipment manufacturing company, copyrighted the term “spin bike” in 2013.

“Unless the instructors are certified under their (Mad Dogg Athletics) program, you can’t use the term,” Chair Bill Richardson said Jan. 29.

Richardson added, “It’s probably better anyway. Bike tells you something, but spin bike what’s that? Indoor cycling, what else could that be?”

Richardson said the kinesiology department officially changed the name in the fall by seeking approval from the College Curriculum Council.

The name changed, but the course stayed the same. Instructors Brad Dudney and Medin K. Barreira teach indoor cycling.

Students ride a stationary bike with a narrow seat that resembles a 10-or 20-speed road bike with thin tires, Richardson explained.

“So you can go fast on them like people on the road bikes versus a kid on a bicycle or mountain bike with thick tires,” he said.

There is a crank on the bike to tighten it up for resistance. Students can ride with little resistance in low gear or crank it up to Gear 6 or 7 to simulate going up hills.

Cranked up very tight, the student would have to do what Richardson called, “stand up in the saddle,” which is pedaling standing up.

“The notion with anything like that (indoor cycling) is to elevate the heart rate enough so it develops cardiorespiratory endurance,” Richardson explained. This is the ability to do prolonged exercise at different levels of intensity.

Richardson said the feedback from students is good. “They’re not knocking down the door saying it’s great, but they’re not saying it’s bad either.”

Richardson gave advice for students in the course, “You’ve got to suck it up and feel a lot of pain for a while. That’s the only way you’re going to build up that endurance and get stronger.”

For information, call 210-486-1010.

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