Turn your voices off and game on

0
Print Friendly
Interpreting freshman Tanisha Morgan and deaf support specialist sophomore Trieu Le play "Guess Who?" at ASL Game Night Friday in Rooms 120 A and B of Nail.  Photo by Maria Duran

Interpreting freshman Tanisha Morgan and deaf support specialist sophomore Trieu Le play “Guess Who?” at ASL Game Night Friday in Rooms 120 A and B of Nail. Photo by Maria Duran

ASL Game Night helps students learn.

By Maria Duran

sac-ranger@alamo.edu

More than 30 American Sign Language and interpreter training students gathered Friday for fun and games sponsored by the Connection Club in Room 120 A and B of the Nail Technical Center.

ASL game night involved games, snacks and the unity between the hearing and deaf community.

There weren’t many rules when it came to game night, but one rule enforced to all was turning voices off.

Psychology sophomore Pam Harper came to game night because she heard it would be a lot of fun.

She said game night is a fun way to get to know deaf people and other ASL students.

Using sign language instead of voices is a challenge, but it’s fun, she said.

Students played board games such as Guess Who? Guesstures, and Battleship.

Others played charades using body language and sign language or hand gestures to communicate.

Some games, such as Taboo, were available but could not be used because they required some speaking.

“It’s a really fun event and it gets deaf people and hearing people together,” said Courtni Jackson, president of the Connection Club and interpreting sophomore.

Jackson said coming to game night and signing is a way for the hearing to be in the same situation as the deaf and it’s equal for both because both understand each other.

“We want to intertwine the two and allow us to have teamwork with everyone,” said Amy Elizondo, vice president of the Connection Club and interpreting sophomore.

“I really think this is beneficial,” she said. It’s beneficial to those students in ASL 1 (first year) through internship, and allows them to practice and learn the language, she said.

Elizondo said game night is an invitation to the deaf community and it’s OK if guests can’t sign because the event has interpreters who interpret for the deaf and sign for guests.

“When you come here (to game night), you learn a lot of things,” especially how to connect with the deaf community, Elizondo said.

The ASL department is connecting the language barriers, Jackson said.

For information on more events, call 210-486-1106.

Share.

Leave A Reply