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Bicyclists and joggers at Síclovía get a treat as the route was changed to South St. Mary’s Street, Roosevelt Avenue and then to Steves Avenue, where most of the participants decided to make a U-turn and headed back toward downtown. Síclovía will be returning to Broadway Sept. 28. Photo by Eric M. Valdez

Bicyclists and joggers at Síclovía get a treat as the route was changed to South St. Mary’s Street, Roosevelt Avenue and then to Steves Avenue, where most of the participants decided to make a U-turn and headed back toward downtown. Síclovía will be returning to Broadway Sept. 28. Photo by Eric M. Valdez

Esferas Perdidas’ marble scavenger hunt is gaining attention for art and outdoor activity.

BMX rider Mark Rios rides up a half pipe launching himself into the air before twisting around to sail down the half pipe Sunday during Síclovía. Ramps were set up outside of S.A. Cycles on South St. Mary’s Street for bikers and skateboarders to show-off their tricks. Rios, S.A. Cycles BMX specialist, said he wouldn’t mind going pro with his riding but rides because he loves it. Photo by Carlos Ferrand

BMX rider Mark Rios rides up a half pipe launching himself into the air before twisting around to sail down the half pipe Sunday during Síclovía. Ramps were set up outside of S.A. Cycles on South St. Mary’s Street for bikers and skateboarders to show-off their tricks. Rios, S.A. Cycles BMX specialist, said he wouldn’t mind going pro with his riding but rides because he loves it. Photo by Carlos Ferrand

By Carlos Ferrand

cferrand@student.alamo.edu

South St. Mary’s Street had plenty of traffic on Sunday, but the traffic consisted of bicycles, strollers, skateboards, roller skates, and even a few unicycles during Síclovía.

Síclovía is a semiannual health and wellness event focused on getting people outside and active.

More than 73,000 people were expected to attend.

The city of San Antonio closed off 2 1/2 miles of road beginning at South St. Mary’s Street and East Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard, winding through the South Side, turning onto Steves Avenue and finishing at Mission Concepción.

While people made their way down the route, there was plenty to do and see along the streets.

At St. Mary’s Street and East Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard, a stage was erected so people could follow along with an instructor doing Zumba.

Along the route, people could participate in extreme core training by lifting tractor tires, rock climbing,

Joseph Gutierrez examines a large glass marble handcrafted by artists of Esferas Perdidas on Sunday during Síclovía. Esferas Perdidas hides the marbles and posts photos and clues on Facebook about the locations. The scavenger hunt was started to get people out and get art in their hands. Gutierrez recently found a marble and said now he is hooked on finding more. Photo by Carlos Ferrand

Joseph Gutierrez examines a large glass marble handcrafted by artists of Esferas Perdidas on Sunday during Síclovía. Esferas Perdidas hides the marbles and posts photos and clues on Facebook about the locations. The scavenger hunt was started to get people out and get art in their hands. Gutierrez recently found a marble and said now he is hooked on finding more. Photo by Carlos Ferrand

dancing and even hula-hooping.

Folks could pull off the trail and listen to live music in the parking lot of  Monterey’s restaurant and pop in for a cold brew.

In Concepción Park, yoga instructor Deborah Charnes led a group from one yoga position to another.

Charnes said it is important to not only be physically healthy, but mentally healthy.

“Yoga can help balance our mind, body and spirit,” she said.

S.A. Cycles provided some excitement with ramps and half pipes for skateboarders and bikers.

Mark Rios, S.A. Cycles BMX specialist, displayed some high-flying tricks off the half pipes.

“It’s just my thing,” Rios said about riding and doing tricks on his BMX.

Further down the route, a large group gathered around the Esferas Perdidas tent to see unique handcrafted marbles.

The group has built a following on Facebook with a marble scavenger hunt.

They post photos and clues of the location of a handcrafted marble. Artist Jake Zollie Harper II said followers on Facebook have increased from 200 to 2,100, since they started hiding marbles in January.

Much like Síclovía, the idea behind the scavenger hunt is getting people outside, Harper said.

“It’s a way to get people out to cool places in San Antonio,” he said. “It’s cool to see families getting out.”

Harper added that it’s nice to put art into people’s hands.

Síclovía is fashioned after Cicolíva, an event that has been running more than 30 years in Bogotá, Colombia.

The next Síclovía will return to the Broadway route 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 28.

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