Rock, paper, study

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Engineering sophomore Israel Rodriguez studies chemistry Oct. 20 in the geology museum located in Room 003 of chemistry and geology.  Photo by Neven Jones

Engineering sophomore Israel Rodriguez studies chemistry Oct. 20 in the geology museum located in Room 003 of chemistry and geology. Photo by Neven Jones

The GeoSpot allows geology students to explore relevant material.

By Landon Penn

sac-ranger@alamo.edu 

The museum, or GeoSpot, in the chemistry and geology building provides a quiet place for geology students to study.

Carlos Flores is the senior specialist of student success, offering tutoring from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

“Since coming here (The GeoSpot), my grades have gone from C’s to A’s,” Said Kelley Jaskinia, a Texas State mass communications sophomore.

“Most students don’t know that the GeoSpot exists,” Flores said.

The GeoSpot is located in Room CG 003. Fossil and rock specimens are displayed on shelves on the walls in the GeoSpot. There are six tables available for students.

Flores said the GeoSpot “always keeps up with the courses” so the specimens are relevant to the current curriculum. For a closer examination of the specimens, a microscope is available for students.

The GeoSpot is open to all students from any Alamo College. The public and any student with knowledge of identification and classification are welcome to volunteer to tutor.

Though the GeoSpot is equipped to assist historical and physical geology students, its tutoring services extend to astronomy students as well.

Anne Dietz, geology professor, said specimens come from several different sources. Some are purchased from companies such as Bone Clones and Skulls Unlimited. Others are donated to the GeoSpot.

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