Criminal justice field offers jobs

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Gloria Hymer, Parker School Uniforms store manager, points at the location where civil engineering freshman Crista Cerda can pickup a job application April 14 at the Career Fair in the Fiesta Room of Loftin. Parker was one of 34 employers represented at the fair. Cerda said the fair was helpful in her search for a summer job.  Photo by Daniel Carde

Gloria Hymer, Parker School Uniforms store manager, points at the location where civil engineering freshman Crista Cerda can pickup a job application April 14 at the Career Fair in the Fiesta Room of Loftin. Parker was one of 34 employers represented at the fair. Cerda said the fair was helpful in her search for a summer job. Photo by Daniel Carde

Career adviser recommends online résumé builder.

By Daniel Carde 

dcarde@student.alamo.edu

Because there always will be crime and criminals, there always will be jobs in the criminal justice field, Senior Cpl. Moses Juarez, Dallas Police Department recruiter, said Tuesday during a career fair in Loftin Student Center.

The criminal justice program and transfer and career center co-hosted the career fair highlighting the criminal justice field with 12 of 34 employer tables occupied by related agencies.

The fair was to introduce students to careers in criminal justice and to help them find a job, Bonnie Clauss, transfer and career center adviser, said at the fair.

She said it is the first time the program and center have corroborated on a career fair.

After speaking with a San Antonio Police Department recruiter, Carina Glover, biology freshman and U.S. Marine Corps veteran, said she is interested in law enforcement because of her military service.

“I like that structure, that uniform life and that service to the community kind of thing — serve and protect,” Glover said.

Candidates must meet the minimum qualifications for employment: being a U.S. citizen, having a valid driver’s license and not having any Class A misdemeanor or felony convictions, Juarez said.

Juarez said they want to hire someone with a serious desire to be a police officer, someone who is trainable with a “never quit kind of attitude.”

He said students should ask about salary, promotions and other opportunities employers can offer.

According to the website for the Dallas Police Department, an officer with a bachelor degree or higher will earn $48,458 while someone without a degree will earn $44,658.

The Dallas department is the ninth largest police department in the U.S. with over 100 specialized units, he said.

Juarez said a potential employee shouldn’t worry about having a stagnant career because there is room for growth.

The department is hiring 200 police officers this year.

“We have lots of opportunities for promotion, advancement, movement, something that will last your career,” Juarez said.

Clauss said that before future job fairs, students should research the job positions and the employers they are interested to determine if they meet the knowledge, skills and abilities needed for jobs.

Students should inquire about the level of education needed and salary range.

Ask questions about the company’s application and hiring process, Clauss said.

Bring a résumé to career fairs, Clauss said.

Students can receive help with their résumés online.

“I would encourage students to look at Optimal Resume,” Clauss said. “It’s a résumé builder so they can put all their information in and it will generate a résumé for them. It can take as little as 15 minutes.”

Glover said she made her résumé using Optimal Resume.

For career advising, call Clauss at 210-486-0772.

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