Retired communication design coordinator named Adviser of the Year

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Professor Emeritus Richard Arredondo entertains several faculty members at his retirement party Jan. 13 at La Fonda on Main. Arredondo was awarded Adviser of the Year at a student leadership banquet on April 15.

Professor Emeritus Richard Arredondo entertains several faculty members at his retirement party Jan. 13 at La Fonda on Main. Arredondo was awarded Adviser of the Year at a student leadership banquet on April 15.

Arredondo remains active in the community.

By Aaron Martinez

amartinez1628@student.alamo.edu

Professor Emeritus Richard Arredondo was named Adviser of the Year April 15 at the leadership award banquet hosted by the office of student life in Loftin Student Center.

He was an adviser to the Catholic Student Association for 25 years before retiring after the fall semester.

“I was honored,” Arredondo said. “Receiving an award that acknowledges my contributions to campus ministry, students and San Antonio College is very rewarding.”

Arredondo was one of two nominees. The other was Jacob-Aidan Martinez, Phi Theta Kappa adviser; however, Martinez did not qualify because he works for the office of student life.

Students from the Catholic Student Center sent nomination letters to the office of student life on why they believe Arredondo should be chosen.

“Richard would always help and go on retreats with students,” said Joseph Liedecke, former campus minister at the Catholic Student Center. “He didn’t sit back and let things happen. He would actually participate with students and get things done.”

As faculty adviser, Arredondo served as the liaison between the college and the Catholic Student Association.

Arredondo began his career at this college in 1984 as an advertising art professor and taught for 30 years.

He was communication design program coordinator 2009-2014. He was chair of visual arts 1997-2009.

Arredondo coordinated Day of The Dead lectures, art exhibitions for communication design students and events on Mexican culture because of his expertise gained while earning a master’s degree in Latin American studies.

As faculty adviser of the Catholic Student Center, he had a close connection with students.

Liedecke said students came to Arredondo when they had personal problems and needed help with school.

“It’s very rewarding knowing that I’ve helped the youth,” Arredondo said. “This is our next generation of leaders to run our community, city and nation.”

Before teaching, Arredondo worked for American Express in New York as an apprentice corporate graphic designer and at the San Antonio Express-News as an advertising artist. He also had his own business.

Since his retirement, Arredondo works on his illustrations and paintings, which are based on spirituality and his life.

His worked has been featured in art exhibits at the University of the Incarnate Word, SAY Si and Centro Cultural Aztlan.

Arredondo said he has been going to lectures and reading books on spirituality, which have brought him closer to his true self and God.

“I spend more time on my own spiritual health,” Arredondo said. “By going to retreats like ones at the Oblate School of Theology I find out more about spirituality and myself.”

“You learn more about your inner being,” he said. “It gives you inner peace and more of a centered connection with God.”

Arredondo returns to the Catholic Student Center for Mass on Wednesdays and occasionally attends Picnic and Parables on Tuesdays.

He reads Scriptures at San Fernando Cathedral and is a Eucharistic minister who serves parishioners the bread and wine that represent the body and blood of Christ.

Since his retirement, Arredondo says he has come across former students who have created their own art and have worked at USAA and the San Antonio Express-News.

“His (Arredondo’s) position can be replaced, but he can’t,” Liedecke said.

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