Comedy meets coming out in theater’s second play of season

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The cast of “Sordid Lives” pretends shock as they watch Earl ‘Brother Boy’ Ingram, played by theater sophomore Eric Dorsa, make a surprise appearance during the final act of the play during rehearseals Tuesday in McCreless Theater. ‘Brother Boy’ wasn’t expected to show up to the funeral of Peggy Ingram, his sister. "Sordid Lives is a comedy about dysfunctional families and coming out in the South. Photo by Melissa Luna

The cast of “Sordid Lives” pretends shock as they watch Earl ‘Brother Boy’ Ingram, played by theater sophomore Eric Dorsa, make a surprise appearance during the final act of the play during rehearseals Tuesday in McCreless Theater. ‘Brother Boy’ wasn’t expected to show up to the funeral of Peggy Ingram, his sister. “Sordid Lives” is a comedy about dysfunctional families and coming out in the South. Photo by Melissa Luna

“Sordid Lives” spotlights challenges for the gay community in the South and offers a chance to meet the playwright.

By Gabriela Rodriguez

sac-ranger@alamo.edu 

“Sordid Lives,” a raw comedy about dysfunctional families and coming out in the South, will premiere in San Antonio at 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and Nov. 19-21 and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday and Nov. 22 in McCreless Theater.

Charles Falcon, theater instructor and director, said playwright and producer Del Shores, originally from Winters, Texas, will give a lecture 12:15-1:30 p.m. Thursday, an acting workshop at 10 a.m. Friday and a meet and greet after the play.

Charles Falcon Theater Instructor and director speaks to the cast of “Sordid Lives”. Photo by Melissa Luna

Charles Falcon Theater Instructor and director speaks to the cast of “Sordid Lives”. Photo by Melissa Luna

With recent changes in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community such as legal same-sex marriage in the U.S., Falcon thought it would be a good idea to do this play.

“It’s a white-trash comedy and melodrama,” he said. “It’s a tale about people who are dysfunctional.”

The play starts with the funeral of a woman who was killed while making love to her married neighbor. The family has to deal with the embarrassing situation and plan the funeral. While they decide what to do, main character Ty Williamson, played by theater sophomore David De Leon II, struggles with coming out because of fear of judgment, being Hispanic and trying to make his dreams come true in the South. De Leon said he takes pride in playing this role and did a lot of research to do justice to the LGBT community, friends and family.

After his visits to gay bars and talking to people, he has a much better appreciation of the discrimination they face every day. De Leon learned how many people still don’t accept members of the LGBT community, who must face this prejudice in the workplace and school.

“It’s pretty tough to hear,” De Leon said. “I love them; they’re my family and friends.”

The play deals with some of the usual struggles of being young and lost, Falcon said.

“I see it really as a story about someone who is trying to understand who he is, understand how he can make it in the world with a family that essentially is against him because of religion and conservative ideals,” Falcon said.

Latrelle Williamson, played by theater sophomore Dalissa Roman, caresses the face of her son Ty Williamson, played by theater sophomore David DeLeon. Ty tells Latrelle he is gay, which Latrelle then says she has known since he was a child. Photo by Melissa Luna

Latrelle Williamson, played by theater sophomore Dalissa Roman, caresses the face of her son Ty Williamson, played by theater sophomore David DeLeon. Ty tells Latrelle he is gay, which Latrelle then says she has known since he was a child. Photo by Melissa Luna

“Sordid Lives” is for a mature audience. “It’s kind of out there,” Falcon said. ‘Lots of fun but lots of language, so it’s not for children at all.”

A short musical number introduces every scene. “It’s an honest portrayal of the dysfunction that many families live,” theater sophomore Dalissa Roman said. “It also brings light to the human rights issue of homosexuality,” Roman, who plays Latrelle, said the play handles a sensitive issue with a lot of comedy.

“I even laugh during rehearsals,” De Leon said.

Tickets are $5 with an Alamo Colleges or high school ID; $8 for other college students, seniors and military; and $10 general admission.

Call Falcon at 210-486-0486.

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