Antojitos festival to offer affordable food, entertainment with Latino flair

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Civil Engineering freshman Vangie Santos  sits in a lowrider while a friend snaps a picture on her cellphone during Antojitos for the Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 25, 2013 in the mall.

Civil Engineering freshman Vangie Santos sits in a lowrider while a friend snaps a picture on her cellphone during Antojitos for the Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 25, 2013 in the mall. File

This college will celebrate Hispanic culture with low-rider cars, snacks, music and crafts.

By James Dusek

sac-ranger@alamo.edu

Fire science freshman Andreas Sisneros looks at a 1974 Caprice Wednesday during the Antojitos Festival in the mall.  File

Fire science freshman Andreas Sisneros looks at a 1974 Caprice Wednesday during the Antojitos Festival in the mall. File

From street tacos and aguas frescas to handcrafted jewelry and eye-catching hot rods, this college will embrace all things Hispanic with its annual Antojitos festival 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 28 in the mall.

The festival features handmade crafts and school organizations and clubs selling more than two dozen types of food, drinks and snacks.

The main attraction of the event will be 10 low-rider cars, including antiques and some with custom-painted artwork. Antojitos will also feature a live DJ from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The event is a long-standing tradition of this college’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations, and never fails to excite those who attend, said senior student success specialist Carrie Hernandez.

A major draw for the event is the affordability of the food, which raises funds for the clubs that participate, she said.

“It’s kind of a win-win situation. A win for the club, and a win for you if you’re buying food from them, because it’s less expensive,” Hernandez said.

“Antojitos” means “little cravings” in Spanish. The festival also offers a variety of foods — including Japanese soda and funnel cakes — for those who crave something other than Hispanic fare.

Drama freshman Emily Sanchez surveys the engine of a 1982 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme called "Southside Hold'n" during Antojitos Festival Sept. 24, 2014 in the mall. Sanchez said she was interested because her grandfather works on cars and she is learning about them.  File

Drama freshman Emily Sanchez surveys the engine of a 1982 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme called “Southside Hold’n” during Antojitos Festival Sept. 24, 2014 in the mall. Sanchez said she was interested because her grandfather works on cars and she is learning about them. File

It’s important to Hernandez that faculty and staff take time to step away from their desks and attend events like the Antojitos festival to avoid getting overwhelmed. She advised they “get out of their offices, come out, mingle with their students, come support our clubs.”

Hernandez said she understands how busy school employees can get.

“Every single event is amazing,” she said of festivals and other happenings on campus. “A lot of work, you know, setup and teardown and stuff, and promoting.”

After all that work, however, Hernandez knows an event like the Antojitos festival is worth the effort when she sees students and employees enjoying themselves.

“As long as they’re having a good time, and I can see that they’re all engaged and dancing and enjoying the music, then it’s a success,” Hernandez said.

To request a booth to sell snacks or crafts, or for any questions about the festival, visit Carrie Hernandez in the office of student life, Room 260A of Loftin Student Center.

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