Rho Sigma Gamma, mortuary club, rises from the dead

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Mortuary science sophomores Danielle Hernandez, Amy Vasquez-Boyosques, Gillian Towars and Serena Lumanye try to restore models of human faces in MRTS 2342, Restorative Art, Oct. 7, 2011.  File

Mortuary science sophomores Danielle Hernandez, Amy Vasquez-Boyosques, Gillian Towars and Serena Lumanye try to restore models of human faces in MRTS 2342, Restorative Art, Oct. 7, 2011. File

Mortuary Science program sponsors annual trip to New Orleans.

By Bismarck D. Andino

sac-ranger@alamo.edu

The mortuary science fraternity, Rho Sigma Gamma, is continuing the comeback members started in the spring.

Although the club has not been active since 2011, this fall members promise to focus more on campus activities as well as community outreach opportunities, Faith Ullom, president of the club, said Sept. 7.

“Now that we have it in 2016 — it kind of faded in and out — but now that we brought it back since last spring, we want to be able to do field trips such as the National Museum of Funeral History in Houston … and famous cemeteries,” Ullom said. “Also, we want do fundraisers for the club so that we can go on these excursions.”

The club contributed to the Children’s Shelter by donating Easter baskets filled with toys and gifts a week before Easter in the spring.

This nonprofit organization provides services for children up to 14 who experience sexual and physical abuse, endangerment and drug related issues, she said.

Ullom said club members also served dinner to children who have incurred a trauma through the loss of a loved one at the Children’s Bereavement Center.

“It’s an awarding opportunity giving back to the children in all ways that we are able to be involved in,” she said. “As Rho Sigma Gamma stands for, reference for the dead, service for the living and growth of self, we plan on continuing such engagement in the community.”

In addition, the purpose of the club is to help students learn outside the classroom, Ullom said.

The mortuary science program sponsors an educational excursion to New Orleans every year.

In New Orleans, the group visits museums; stores based around funerals, such as Jazz Funeral; and St. Louis Cemetery to learn more about funeral history.

This semester, members want to do workshops to teach students to use equipment in labs and artifacts in the Catholic faith for a funeral service.

The club will have guest speakers, and students will be working and learning from professionals in the field, she said.

“They’re going to get a different perspective of, hopefully, mortuary science,” she said.

Although it is a two-year program, Ullom said students could work in funeral homes or mortuaries during the program if seeking a career in the death-care industry.

Students can get more information on the organization and mortuary science by contacting Cynthia Escatel, student success generalist, at 210-486-1137.

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