Art exhibit featuring faculty returns after a decade.

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SAC graduate Dante Dipasauale and fine arts Esaias Machado discuss Norbert Clyde Martinez Jr.’s piece “IPTF” at the Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition Oct. 13 in the visual arts center gallery. The exhibit showcases the work of 15 faculty members. This exhibit will run from Oct. 13 to Dec. 2, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday. Weekends closed.  Photo by Josue Hernandez

SAC graduate Dante Dipasauale and fine arts sophomore Esaias Machado discuss Norbert Clyde Martinez Jr.’s piece “IPTF” at the Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition Oct. 13 in the visual arts center gallery. The exhibit showcases the work of 15 faculty members. This exhibit will run from Oct. 13 to Dec. 2, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday. Weekends closed. Photo by Josue Hernandez

15 visual arts teachers showcase a variety of media.

By Miranda A. Holden

sac-ranger@alamo.edu    

An exhibit featuring the work of 15 visual arts faculty members opened Thursday in the visual arts center, 950 Lewis St.

Showcasing over 20 recent paintings, sculptures, ceramics, drawings and other forms of media, the exhibit revealed the broad technique of faculty.

Open through Dec. 2, the exhibit features the work of Instructor Alfonso Cantu; Professor Eduardo Rodriguez; visual arts Coordinator Rebecca Dietz; and adjuncts Stacy Berlfein, Roberta Buckles, Michael Coyle, Jessica Decuir, Alfonso Espronceda, Emily Fleisher, Angela Fox, Lawrence Jennings, Carlos Loera, Norbert Clyde Martinez Jr., Charlie Morris and Ty Wilcox.

Rodriguez, exhibit curator, said new professors have joined the department and haven’t participated in an exhibit with such significance since the last faculty exhibit 10 years ago.

“It’s good for institutions to have a faculty exhibit for students to recognize what we do,” Rodriguez said.

Visitors will see the diversity of the program’s faculty as pieces present various styles and a glimpse into the artists’ methods that inspire them to create and teach art.

Wilcox expresses Southern humor through a piece labeled, “In the acceptance of the inherent lies in everything, if you got a big hat then you got no cattle.”

Born and raised in a small town, Gunter, Wilcox channels his inner Southern language through his work to emphasize his roots.

His second piece titled “Gone, Gone, Gone” is a tribute to his father who died two years ago.

Using graphite and epoxy primer on aluminum, the text reads “saw it as several other things” written backwards to honor memories shared with his father growing up on a 90-acre property.

Illustrated in black and white, the piece duplicates scenery from the property including the house and barn he built with his father and uncle.

“This piece is the most personal one I’ve ever made in my career,” Wilcox said Oct. 13, noting that it took him six months to perfect.

Two pieces by Martinez use a geometric perspective in which the viewer stands on a mark observing the image in the eye of the artist’s perception.

Martinez’s piece titled “Fia II” demonstrated this technique consisting of a male plastic action figure wrapped around a bronze crucifix with 728 yards of yarn.

The crucifix was attached to the wall holding the figure face down creating the illusion as if it were falling.

Viewers stood on footprints in front of the object getting a bird’s-eye view to better understand Martinez’s mental representation.

In addition to displaying talent by faculty, the exhibit allows students to see their mentors put meaning into art.

Fine arts sophomore Justin Mendez said it’s nice to be able to see the faculty’s work outside of teaching.

Mendez finds the work of Rodriguez and Martinez to be fascinating by their conceptual illusions and ability to make one understand the meaning of their perspectives.

The exhibit is open 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday through Dec. 2.

For more information, contct Rodriguez at 210-486-1040 or email erodriguez2@alamo.edu

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