Phi Theta Kappa hosts inauguration event

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Faculty adviser Jim Lucchelli leads inductees of the Beta Nu chapter of Phi Theta Kappa in the oath of membership at the induction ceremony Nov. 3 in McAllister Auditorium. Photo by Alison Graef

Faculty adviser Jim Lucchelli leads inductees of the Beta Nu chapter of Phi Theta Kappa in the oath of membership at the induction ceremony Nov. 3 in McAllister Auditorium. Photo by Alison Graef

Students are honored for high GPAs and membership.

By Estefania Flores

sac-ranger@alamo.edu

Phi Theta Kappa historian Elizabeth Hill welcomes dance sophomore Brittany Jennings to the Beta Nu chapter at the induction ceremony Nov. 3 in McAllister Auditorium. Photo by Alison Graef

Phi Theta Kappa historian Elizabeth Hill welcomes dance sophomore Brittany Jennings to the Beta Nu chapter at the induction ceremony Nov. 3 in McAllister Auditorium. Photo by Alison Graef

More than half of the first-floor seats were filled Nov. 3 in the auditorium of McAllister Fine Arts Center to inaugurate members of the Beta Nu Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the college honor society.

Thirty-five students were inducted to the organization, cheered on by friends, family and prospective members.

Adviser Roger Stanley, professor of astronomy, was in charge of the event.

“It was very satisfying to see new faces walk on stage and become official members of Phi Theta Kappa,” Stanley said.

To be a part of this society, a student must achieve a minimum of a 3.5 grade-point average with 12 or more college-credit hours.

“It’s a very exciting time for me,” psychology sophomore Keeli Cherharris said. “I showed up to the ceremony to get to know all new members and take pictures for my mom because I’m sure she’ll have a picture hanging up around her house eventually. She’s very proud.”

The ceremony opened with the national anthem sung by Adel Gutierrez, certified adviser ad adjunct.

President Robert Vela remarked on his humble beginnings.

Vela said he attended a community college. He told students they can become whatever they want to in their careers.

Vela received an honorary Phi Theta Kappa certificate followed by a gift bag as a token of appreciation from the officers of the organization.

“This feels like Christmas for me,” Vela said.

Lisa Christine Garcia, special education and counseling sophomore, told the audience she was misdiagnosed with a disease after receiving her high school diploma.

She said doctors gave her treatments that made her feel ill and weak for 16 years, which forced her to put her education on standby until she felt strong enough to enter college at age 28.

Garcia said she battled depression, insecurity and confusion once the treatment was terminated.

After a year at this college, Garcia was inaugurated as a member and officer of the society.

Garcia is vice president of scholarship.

Garcia has maintained a 4.0 GPA for 2 1/2 years.

“Phi Theta Kappa showed me that I am an overcomer,” Garcia said. “I can reach my full potential and have the ability to overcome anything in my path.”

Members took an oath, reciting the Phi Theta Kappa pledge, followed by a handshake from all Phi Theta Kappa officers on stage.

The event concluded with a reception in the lobby with food and beverages and blue and yellow cupcakes representing the colors of the organization.

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