You’ve registered to vote; now what can you do?

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Your civic duty does not end Nov. 6.

By Nov. 7 Texans will know if they have elected a new senator, governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, congressional representatives, seven members of the state board of education, judges, commissioners and many more positions.

Your vote is important. You owe it to yourself and your fellow citizens to read up on the issues that concern your community and make your voice heard at the ballot box.

Attend the rallies of candidates or incumbents who are asking for your vote or join a campaign to block walk or give rides to the polls.

But that only covers what you can do through Nov. 6.

The actions of your elected officials will affect you and your community long after the election so you need to take advantage of ways to get your message to officeholders throughout their terms in office.

If you want to be able make informed decisions about the policies being enacted on a local and state level, you need to do your best to stay informed and become an active participant in your community.

Throughout the year, you should be going to town hall meetings with local officials, joining groups concerned about your issues and reading the news surrounding your local and state governments.

The San Antonio City Council meets at 9 a.m. every Thursday, except the fourth Thursday of the month, and at 2 p.m. every Wednesday. All of the information for City Council meetings can be found at https://www.sanantonio.gov/Council/CityCouncilMeetings#215012676-meetings.

A calendar of past and upcoming meeting agendas can be found at https://sanantonio.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx

If you would like to run for local office, information on that can be found at https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/candidates/guide/local.shtml.

Go to meetings. Let local officials see you and make them hear you.

But your ability to make a difference in the community does not end there.

Political activist groups are working throughout the state. Join the groups you feel are best working to make state and local leaders answer your concerns.

Write letters, call officials, ask questions and don’t wait until an election is over to take to the streets.

Give to your community.

Make the people on the top aware of your discontent and support those who listen.

It’s going to be hard. The road to meaningful, long-lasting political change always is. But sitting on the sidelines is a luxury no one can afford anymore.

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