SAPD investigates former district police officer for family violence

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The officer was fired from Alamo Colleges police department.

By Liandre De la Uso

ldelauso@student.alamo.edu

Marlon Go, a former Alamo Colleges police officer, is under investigation after being arrested Sept. 16 and charged with assault by strangulation of a family member.

His employment with the district police department was terminated Oct. 12, Deputy Chief of Police Jesse Trevino said Oct. 19.

Go had worked in the patrol division at Northwest Vista.

His shift was 2-10 p.m. He had been employed since May 2013.

According to a police report from the San Antonio Police Department, Go was at his home in Helotes with his girlfriend when his estranged wife arrived.

According to the report:

His wife became upset and slapped him. Go retaliated and slapped her with an open hand. Go’s wife attempted to call the police but had her phone taken away. The victim threw Go’s watch, which was on the countertop, breaking it, and Go proceeded to strangle her.

The victim was brought to the hospital Sept. 17 and reported heavy bruising on her neck and difficulty with motion.

Go was arrested and released on bond.

He was immediately put on administrative leave after Alamo Colleges became aware of the incident, Trevino said Oct. 19.

Trevino confirmed the reports in an interview.

“We do a very thorough background check,” Trevino said. “There’s a very extensive process that we go through before we hire. He was a good employee, never had any issues to my knowledge.”

No indictments have been handed up by the district attorney’s office in the case.

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  1. What a way to close out Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The Oct 29 Ranger reported that “SAPD investigates former district police officer for family violence.” The subtitle said, “The officer was fired from Alamo Colleges police department,” and therein lies a lesson.
    Officer “Go was at his home in Helotes with his girlfriend when his estranged wife arrived. According to the report: His wife became upset and slapped him. Go retaliated…” The article also reports, “The victim threw Go’s watch, which was on the countertop, breaking it, and Go proceeded to strangle her.”
    The lesson for men: Even if you are minding your business at your house, if a female starts attacking you and breaking your stuff, leave. You will be arrested and lose your job if you fight back.
    The lesson for women: If you attack a man, you will not be arrested and you won’t lose your job. But you will suffer retaliation.
    Just about every suggestion for the prevention of intimate partner violence is related to changing men’s behavior.
    The debate continues about the various predictors of domestic violence. Sometimes, a couple may not have the capacity to steer clear of an altercation. Add poverty, low education, mental instability, or intoxication, and the likelihood of violence ignites.
    But the component that most everyone ignores is illustrated in-between the lines in the Oct 29 article. The woman hits the man and the man strikes back. This is called bi-directional violence. And here’s the important part:
    Women initiate bi-directional violence most of the time. Men initiate one-sided violence only 30 percent of the time.
    Domestic Violence Awareness Month was formed more than 30 years ago – and not much has changed. That is because politicians and the media portray the issue as a man’s problem – as if only men can stop domestic violence.
    But to reduce the number of women hurt by their partner’s violence, we need to teach everyone to refrain from throwing that first punch.

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